OldArchive / Page One News

Emergency Responders Mark 9-11 on First Friday

 

By Rick Hiduk

Rather than try to compete with larger regional and national events planned to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on America and the nation’s response to the tragedy, organizers of Towanda’s monthly First Friday promotion conducted a parade down Main Street and a service on the stairs of the Bradford County Courthouse just nine days early to mark the historic event. Although skies had grown dark by 6:30 p.m., the rains held off, and the air was warm and humid.

 Crafters, food vendors, and downtown businesses offering great deals attracted hundreds of people to the area surrounding the courthouse. Many children and a few flexible parents tested their agility at an inflatable obstacle course set up in the Chemung Canal Trust Company parking lot. Youths like Wayne Igoe of Troy and Zoe Czajkowski of Wysox befriended kittens brought for adoption and socializing by the animal welfare group Happy Tails. Jeremy Orshal of South Towanda entertained First Friday patrons as he rode up and down the sidewalks on a unicycle. Brenda Lambert of Ulster tried on for size several clothing items crocheted by Lynne Hawley of Towanda. Karen Reeve of Towanda sold chances to win an American flag crocheted by Phyllis Reed of New Albany for the Lt. Asa Stevens NSDAR Chapter’s 90th anniversary, and local radio stations brought their mascots to town and handed out flags.

Attention turned to the street at 7 p.m., as a line of fire trucks, ambulances, and other emergency response vehicles made their way past the courthouse and on to the Keystone Theatre, where employees were preparing for their Grand Temporary Closing movie party. After the parade, Towanda mayor Garrett Miller welcomed the crowd that was growing in the area of the statues in front of the courthouse and introduced Judy Black, who set the tone for the event with her singing of the national anthem.

Key speakers included news reporter Bob Igoe, who recalled the “numbness” he felt as he drove toward Shanksville with no idea of what he might encounter there. Troy mayor Mike Powers told of his love of New York City as a child growing up in Paterson, NJ, and of how the logos of the New York Mets and many first response units in the city still bear silhouettes of the twin World Trade Center towers. The Rev. Jim Hollister of Towanda’s First United Methodist Church offered the closing prayer for an event that eventually drew about 60 spectators, including numerous local first responders. First Friday patrons had an opportunity to sign a large banner thanking first responders for their service to the nation and their individual communities.

Towanda’s next First Friday celebration, slated for Oct. 7, will take on a Heritage Days theme, according to committee members. Antique tractors will be on display, and there will be a kids’ pedal tractor pull contest. November’s First Friday on Nov. 4 will take on a tailgate party theme, with football related contests and exhibits.

 

Emergency Responders Mark 9/11 on First Friday

By Rick Hiduk

 

Rather than try to compete with larger regional and national events planned to mark the 10th anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on America and the nation’s response to the tragedy, organizers of Towanda’s monthly First Friday promotion conducted a parade down Main Street and a service on the stairs of the Bradford County Courthouse just nine days early to mark the historic event. Although skies had grown dark by 6:30 p.m., the rains held off, and the air was warm and humid.

 Crafters, food vendors, and downtown businesses offering great deals attracted hundreds of people to the area surrounding the courthouse. Many children and a few flexible parents tested their agility at an inflatable obstacle course set up in the Chemung Canal Trust Company parking lot. Youths like Wayne Igoe of Troy and Zoe Czajkowski of Wysox befriended kittens brought for adoption and socializing by the animal welfare group Happy Tails. Jeremy Orshal of South Towanda entertained First Friday patrons as he rode up and down the sidewalks on a unicycle. Brenda Lambert of Ulster tried on for size several clothing items crocheted by Lynne Hawley of Towanda. Karen Reeve of Towanda sold chances to win an American flag crocheted by Phyllis Reed of New Albany for the Lt. Asa Stevens NSDAR Chapter’s 90th anniversary, and local radio stations brought their mascots to town and handed out flags.

Attention turned to the street at 7 p.m., as a line of fire trucks, ambulances, and other emergency response vehicles made their way past the courthouse and on to the Keystone Theatre, where employees were preparing for their Grand Temporary Closing movie party. After the parade, Towanda mayor Garrett Miller welcomed the crowd that was growing in the area of the statues in front of the courthouse and introduced Judy Black, who set the tone for the event with her singing of the national anthem.

Key speakers included news reporter Bob Igoe, who recalled the “numbness” he felt as he drove toward Shanksville with no idea of what he might encounter there. Troy mayor Mike Powers told of his love of New York City as a child growing up in Paterson, NJ, and of how the logos of the New York Mets and many first response units in the city still bear silhouettes of the twin World Trade Center towers. The Rev. Jim Hollister of Towanda’s First United Methodist Church offered the closing prayer for an event that eventually drew about 60 spectators, including numerous local first responders. First Friday patrons had an opportunity to sign a large banner thanking first responders for their service to the nation and their individual communities.

Towanda’s next First Friday celebration, slated for Oct. 7, will take on a Heritage Days theme, according to committee members. Antique tractors will be on display, and there will be a kids’ pedal tractor pull contest. November’s First Friday on Nov. 4 will take on a tailgate party theme, with football related contests and exhibits.

 


 Troy mayor Mike Powers was among the key speakers to mark the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in NYC as part of First Friday in Towanda on Sept. 2. The ceremony at the courthouse followed a parade of local first response units on Main Street. Photo by Rick Hiduk Troy mayor Mike Powers was among the key speakers to mark the 10th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks on the World Trade Center in NYC as part of First Friday in Towanda on Sept. 2. The ceremony at the courthouse followed a parade of local first response units on Main Street. Photo by Rick Hiduk

Return to top

Copyright 2011-2014 Rocket-Courier. All rights reserved.